Callie Baker –Lessons She Taught Me

Last Friday evening my foreman passed away in her sleep. She was going to be 12 this December. She was by my side as I wrote these messages to each of you. Her dedication and loyalty was a constant reminder of exactly what it takes to be a farmer. She never complained about today but instead looked forward to tomorrow. As they say in agriculture, hope springs eternally each year. To her it was the excitement of just the fresh air hitting her as we rode to our next destination. In short, she never complained and looked forward to the next new adventure.

Her passing made me pause. Nothing lasts forever. Everything worthwhile needs hope. My question today is, are we on the verge of an enormous shift in all of agriculture? I see the erosion of the traditional family farm. The family farm is still the base but economic necessity is making those that continue need the core of generations before. Recently we loss John Fowler. He was fifth generation. He did not get to where he was alone. It took dedication from many Fowler’s long gone.

Change is going to happen in everything we come in touch with today. Farming is not exempt. To build the base necessary to have a commercial farm today it almost has to come from inspiration from generations before you. I have often jokingly referred to farming as the “curse of our Fathers.” Most of the large farms of today are a result of generations learning their trade and expanding to adapt to change.

Paul Baker,
Executive Director
NYSHS

I said earlier that “everything worthwhile needs hope.”  I am very concerned that not all those who are willing to take up the challenge of agriculture will always have that feeling, like Callie did, that tomorrow would be exciting and full of opportunity.

As a fruit farmer you collectively agree to have funds deducted from your account to invest in applied research. In the short run, funds could most likely be better used to buy that new tractor you desperately need. Research is a gamble, with no certainty to success. The only certainty you have is, if you do not have research you will stagnate and fall by the wayside. There would be no new orchard systems or exciting varieties to grow without it. Research is for the future. Research offers hope and new opportunity.

Callie reminded us all that no matter how good things are today they will not last forever. Change is on the horizon. Farming is not for everyone. In fact, it is for a very select few. Life depends on the constant renewal of food supplies. We must not allow the remaining few who are willing to accept the “curse of their Fathers” to ever lose hope.

Our challenge then is to somehow educate, enlighten and convince all those mouths we feed each day. We have no choice but to protect agriculture and all those who are willing to accept the challenge of feeding us.

Callie would hate to think that there never again would be a pickup truck window rumbling down a farm lane to ride in. For all the future “Callie’

s” let’s make certain we keep this industry full of hope. Time will record if we allowed this industry to pass away. Remember nothing last forever

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