Life is a Series of Choices

If you really stop to think of it every one of us is on a different life path. Yes, we may have many similarities with family and friends but none of us are exactly alike. The reason is because when presented with a “life altering” decision we each have different keys to making that decision.

There is no one perfect formula to how to manage your business. Every farm has select pressure points. In 2020 you will be asked to begin to make choices as to how to coexist with the new Farm Labor Act here in New York State. One choice you will not have is to decide to ignore it. It is the law so we must accept it for what it is and learn to function within its rules.

Most every person I have confronted is nervous as to how to deal with the pending possibility of having a labor union on their farm. At the Becker Forum this last January Brad Goehring, a wine grower from California, addressed the group. California has had many seasons of dealing with labor unions. His message was really quite simple. Your help really has no desire to join a labor union so long as you choose to be a good employer. Less than 10% of the farm labor in California is currently under union direction. Farm workers do not want to be told what they can and cannot do by a union. They most certainly do not wish to have to pay dues.

I feel very confident in stating that as an employer you value your work force. You have bu

Paul Baker,
Executive Director
NYSHS

ilt your team many times over decades. It is the single most important production piece in your portfolio. As needs and wages changed you found ways to meet these demands. In short you made choices that were in the best interest of your farm and everyone associated with it. This is what being a good employer does. You do not fear a union organizer coming to promise new things which they in truth have no control over. They can claim to say they will get workers higher wages but in truth they do not have that power. You on the other hand can act on your promises.

In 2020 we will need to illustrate to our legislators that we are choosing to comply with this new legislation. To try to undermine the basic tenants of the Act will only encourage new legislation that is not necessary. The Democratic controlled Senate has very little in common with production agriculture. From Niagara County to Albany there is only one Democratic Senator. Senator Rachel May in the 53rd district in the Syracuse area is the lone Senator. Senator Tim Kennedy from Erie County in the 63rd district in South Buffalo is the closest. To further illustrate the divide the Republican Senators in New York have in excess of $5 billion of farm assets in their collective districts. The majority of Democratic Senators have a grand total of $365 million in farm assets. We have an enormous educational challenge ahead of us if we are to garner the needed votes to approve the funding for all the various agricultural programs that flow through Albany.

So, we end by accepting that individually and collectively we have many choices to make in 2020. Individually I trust you will make the best choices for your farm and family. Collectively we need to invest in educating our legislators as to the mutual need for a strong and progressive agriculture in New York State. Unfortunately, we all cannot live on a farm in New York State. We all are consumers of the tremendous products and clean water that are a product of our choices.

Winter 2020

– Picking the Right Rootstock for Fresh and Processing Apple Orchards  – Investigating the Behavior and Biology of Locally Overwintered Spotted-wing Drosophila Disease in Michigan – Establishment, Persistence and Impact of Native NY Entomopathogenic Nematodes on Plum Curculio In Apples Management in Apple Orchards – MSU Apple Replant Field Trial at the Clarksville Research Center

Winter 2020  Issue

Fall 2018

  1. Economic Case Studies of Cider Apple Orchards in NYS
  2. Mite-Flaring Impact of New Insecticides on European Red Mites in Apples
  3. Understanding Strawberry Root Problems that Impact Berry Farm Profitability
  4. Bitter Pit Mitigation & the ‘Honeycrisp’ Apple
  5. Orchard Automation & Genes Relevant to Apple Tree Architecture
  6. Editorial – Cleaning Up Our Act: Thoughts on Sustainability

Fall 2018 Issue

Summer 2018

Editorial – Behind the Scenes by Bill Dodd, Premier Apple

  1. Update on New Apple Varieties and Clubs
  2. Studies on Pollination and Fungicide Use During Orchard Bloom
  3. Bacterial Strain Affects Cultivar Response to Fire Blight in Apples
  4. Non-Mineral Prediction of Bitter Pit in ‘Honeycrisp’ Apples
  5. Breeding Apple Rootstocks to Match Cultural and Nutrient Requirements of Scion Varieties

Summer 2018 Issue

Spring 2018

Editorial – Behind the Scenes by Kevin Maloney, Cornell AgriTech at NYSAES

  1. The Use of Plant Growth Regulators for Crop Load Management in Apples
  2. Evaluation of Fruit Wastes as Off-Season Potential Breeding Sources for Spotted-Wing Drosophila in Michigan
  3. Why Is ‘Honeycrisp’ so Susceptible to Bitter Pit?
  4. Repellents to Prevent Ambrosia Beetle Infestations in Apples
  5. New Advances to Narrower Canopy Systems

Spring 2018 Issue

Winter 2017

Editorial – Apple Industry Evolves to Meet Market, Environmental, and Regulatory Challenges Through Science

  1. On-Farm Evaluation of Apple IPM Protocols in the Champlain Valley
  2. Wild apple species as a source of fire blight resistance for sustainable productivity of apple orchards
  3. Red-juiced apple cultivars for Great Lakes production
  4. Evaluation of newer biologicals and the SAR-activator candidate Regalia in fire blight control applied by spraying or trunk injection
  5. Expanding the Range of the Samurai Wasp, Trissolcus japonicus, in New York Orchards

Winter 2017 Issue