New Crop in 2020 But is There Anything Else New?

There is a famous saying, “If you do the same thing over and over-looking for a better end, why should you expect any new outcome?”

Since early America we have been growing apples in New York State. Always received as a favorite fruit by the people consuming them. Primary usage has been fresh eating out of hand, cider or baking of desserts. Later we introduced apple sauce to the mix. Near the end of the last century we tried to link apples with health. In my mind only limited market success. Nothing negative but not really a shot in the arm for movement.

Fast forward to 2020. We have asparagus and strawberries every day of the year. Fruits and vegetables no longer have seasons associated with them. Today’s commodities are expected to be on the consumers shopping lists year-round. What are we offering new in 2020 other than a new club variety to be used as it was 300 years ago? Let’s be honest here and admit we are in a bit of a rut.

I took the time to drive around the area recently. I saw incredible innovations in horticulture skills and

Paul Baker,
Executive Director
NYSHS

applications. I witnessed an operation inside a major apple packing plant that was combining apples with potatoes, cucumbers, onions and carrots. This was to move 20 pounds of produce to national distribution. The combination of including apples with other commodities was moving product. It was keeping apples in the daily usage. It was not a stand-alone product, but it was moving product!

I think we have become victims of tradition. Ford Motor began making one car model. Henry quickly observed he needed to make different models, colors and even trucks. We live in a time when anything NEW has a noticeably short shelf life. What I am suggesting is we have a time proven product but a very stale delivery. For example, is the target of our promotions the housewife alone? True she has held most of this responsibility overtime. Ask yourself, how does an item get on her list? Have we as an industry offered enough fresh stimulus to rate being on this critical list?

I personally think we have failed miserably for years to influence the buying power of children. Disney certainly saw the wisdom of making entertainment designed for children. They In turn influenced the adults to become consumers. Children have special needs. They have loose or missing teeth! They have braces that make eating a challenge. Do we ignore these children during this critical time or search new ways to deliver our product to them in a form they can enjoy? I think slicing has been a success here. Question here is, have we done all we could to develop this market?

Open your imagination again. Peanuts grown in the south found a great partner in the north in grapes. Introducing the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Hot dogs and french fries, macaroni and cheese and so on. My question is what product are we searching for and willing to promote to become our “peanut butter and jelly sandwich?’

Apples are a great product. However, I think we need to reintroduce the product to a new consumer. Every promotion will not be a winner. I think the challenge for the apple industry is for the marketing and sales departments to keep up with the horticultural advancements I witnessed in the modern orchard. We can not only improve the orchards. Our job is not completed until our product is in demand on a daily basis. Yes, it is a challenge, but as farmers I think we do our absolute best when faced with challenges.

Send me your ideas for the new apple “peanut butter and jelly sandwich.”

Life is a Series of Choices

If you really stop to think of it every one of us is on a different life path. Yes, we may have many similarities with family and friends but none of us are exactly alike. The reason is because when presented with a “life altering” decision we each have different keys to making that decision.

There is no one perfect formula to how to manage your business. Every farm has select pressure points. In 2020 you will be asked to begin to make choices as to how to coexist with the new Farm Labor Act here in New York State. One choice you will not have is to decide to ignore it. It is the law so we must accept it for what it is and learn to function within its rules.

Most every person I have confronted is nervous as to how to deal with the pending possibility of having a labor union on their farm. At the Becker Forum this last January Brad Goehring, a wine grower from California, addressed the group. California has had many seasons of dealing with labor unions. His message was really quite simple. Your help really has no desire to join a labor union so long as you choose to be a good employer. Less than 10% of the farm labor in California is currently under union direction. Farm workers do not want to be told what they can and cannot do by a union. They most certainly do not wish to have to pay dues.

I feel very confident in stating that as an employer you value your work force. You have bu

Paul Baker,
Executive Director
NYSHS

ilt your team many times over decades. It is the single most important production piece in your portfolio. As needs and wages changed you found ways to meet these demands. In short you made choices that were in the best interest of your farm and everyone associated with it. This is what being a good employer does. You do not fear a union organizer coming to promise new things which they in truth have no control over. They can claim to say they will get workers higher wages but in truth they do not have that power. You on the other hand can act on your promises.

In 2020 we will need to illustrate to our legislators that we are choosing to comply with this new legislation. To try to undermine the basic tenants of the Act will only encourage new legislation that is not necessary. The Democratic controlled Senate has very little in common with production agriculture. From Niagara County to Albany there is only one Democratic Senator. Senator Rachel May in the 53rd district in the Syracuse area is the lone Senator. Senator Tim Kennedy from Erie County in the 63rd district in South Buffalo is the closest. To further illustrate the divide the Republican Senators in New York have in excess of $5 billion of farm assets in their collective districts. The majority of Democratic Senators have a grand total of $365 million in farm assets. We have an enormous educational challenge ahead of us if we are to garner the needed votes to approve the funding for all the various agricultural programs that flow through Albany.

So, we end by accepting that individually and collectively we have many choices to make in 2020. Individually I trust you will make the best choices for your farm and family. Collectively we need to invest in educating our legislators as to the mutual need for a strong and progressive agriculture in New York State. Unfortunately, we all cannot live on a farm in New York State. We all are consumers of the tremendous products and clean water that are a product of our choices.