Fruit Quarterly Issues

Showing 10 of 97 Results

Spring 2024

Editorial: Workforce Development

he fruit business is a people business. While accessing land, selecting varieties, constructing orchards, and marketing products are all still important, none of this happens without the people in place to make it all work. In recent years, this has become all too clear as labor issues challenge businesses throughout the industry.

Winter 2023

Editorial: The value of research and extension for the fruit industry

Now that the harvest season is over and fruit growers can reflect on the 2023 season, I have been reflecting on how apple growing has changed in the last 40 years with much of that change driven by research and extension at Cornell and other research institutions. I won’t detail the changes now but want to simply pay tribute to the great group of research and ex-tension folks we have in NY and MI. A generation of researchers and extension educators have retired while a new generation of researchers and extension agents have taken their place. Both past and present members of the Cornell team and the Michigan State team have made tremendous contributions to the fruit industry. I am proud of them and hope you are supportive and appreciative of their contributions to your business.

Summer 2023

Editorial: Premier Apple Cooperative, Inc

What is the Premier Apple Cooperative, Inc (Premier) and why is it important to the apple industry?

Premier was formed by a group of concerned apple industry leaders (Producers) from New York State in 2001 (22 years ago), under the leadership of George Lamont. A “Producer” as defined by the Cooperative’s Bylaws is a person or company engaged in the production of agricultural or horticultural products. The Producers were concerned about the low prices of apples and the returns to growers. Premier was organized as a
Cooperative having status as an association recognized under the Copper–Volstead Act (7 U.S.C. # 291,292). This status allows members (producers) to legally discuss prices. Premier quickly realized that to be effective, the Cooperative needed to add Producers from other states in the same geographic area. Currently, there are Producers from the following states: Michigan, Ohio, New York, Massachusetts, Maine, Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina.

Spring 2023

Editorial: The Challenges We Face

I began my career as a Champlain Valley apple grower in June of 2016. Fresh faced after my college experience, I was excited to begin my adult life working in agriculture alongside my family. Food is my passion, and farming is such a great way to express that. I enjoyed my new beginnings in spring for about a week before our region was blindsided by the fire blight outbreak. Previously rare this far north, researchers visited from near and far as Champlain Valley growers attempted to figure out how to put the veritable wildfire at bay. I spent the summer getting a shotgun initiation into the trials of farming. My grandfather had always said that one great thing about what we do is the predictability. Prune in winter, set your crop in spring, maintain it in summer, harvest in fall. He neglected to advertise the less predictable aspects of the job, and little did I know that this event would set the tune for the rest of my career thus far.

Winter 2022

Editorial: The Challenges We Face

I began my career as a Champlain Valley apple grower in June of 2016. Fresh faced after my college experience, I was excited to begin my adult life working in agriculture alongside my family. Food is my passion, and farming is such a great way to express that. I enjoyed my new beginnings in spring for about a week before our region was blindsided by the fire blight outbreak. Previously rare this far north, researchers visited from near and far as Champlain Valley growers attempted to figure out how to put the veritable wildfire at bay. I spent the summer getting a shotgun initiation into the trials of farming. My grandfather had always said that one great thing about what we do is the predictability. Prune in winter, set your crop in spring, maintain it in summer, harvest in fall. He neglected to advertise the less predictable aspects of the job, and little did I know that this event would set the tune for the rest of my career thus far.

Fall 2022

Editorial: The Challenges We Face

I began my career as a Champlain Valley apple grower in June of 2016. Fresh faced after my college experience, I was excited to begin my adult life working in agriculture alongside my family. Food is my passion, and farming is such a great way to express that. I enjoyed my new beginnings in spring for about a week before our region was blindsided by the fire blight outbreak. Previously rare this far north, researchers visited from near and far as Champlain Valley growers attempted to figure out how to put the veritable wildfire at bay. I spent the summer getting a shotgun initiation into the trials of farming. My grandfather had always said that one great thing about what we do is the predictability. Prune in winter, set your crop in spring, maintain it in summer, harvest in fall. He neglected to advertise the less predictable aspects of the job, and little did I know that this event would set the tune for the rest of my career thus far.

Summer 2022

Editorial: Use Social Media for Positive Information on Fruit Farming

I recently made a Facebook post with a picture of my apricot trees in bloom with an explanation of why I can grow apricots.When I went back a few hours later, I was amazed at how many people liked it, loved it, shared it and commented. With all the negative press out there about modern agriculture, these was an epiphany for me. People want information. They want good information. They want it from people who really know and trust. They trust real farmers.

Spring 2022

Editorial: The Challenges We Face

I began my career as a Champlain Valley apple grower in June of 2016. Fresh faced after my college experience, I was excited to begin my adult life working in agriculture alongside my family. Food is my passion, and farming is such a great way to express that. I enjoyed my new beginnings in spring for about a week before our region was blindsided by the fire blight outbreak. Previously rare this far north, researchers visited from near and far as Champlain Valley growers attempted to figure out how to put the veritable wildfire at bay. I spent the summer getting a shotgun initiation into the trials of farming. My grandfather had always said that one great thing about what we do is the predictability. Prune in winter, set your crop in spring, maintain it in summer, harvest in fall. He neglected to advertise the less predictable aspects of the job, and little did I know that this event would set the tune for the rest of my career thus far.